Las Fallas

March in Valencia

Fireworks, Snap, Crackle, Pop, Valencia on Fire

Duration: 19 days
Where: Valencia

Do you enjoy cracking/popping sounds of firecrackers (petardos) at every turn? How about a gunpowder/fireworks display every day for at least 3 weeks? If you answered “Yes!”, then March in Valencia is perfect for you.

To mark the start of the festivities, everyday at 2pm at Plaza Ayuntamiento, the city vibrates to La Mascletá (pyrotechnic celebration and gunpowder explosions). Once the excitement dies down, the city’s terraces fill up as people go to enjoy a drink and some food under the Mediterranean sun.

For an entire week, gigantic, colourful figures fill the city’s squares and streets.

Ninots

Often satirical with political references or pop-culture and events that happened throughout the year. Each and every one of them is spectacular.

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A Bit of History

Las Fallas (Las Falles in Valencian) dates back to the 18th Century and the old traditions of the carpenters. On the feast day of Saint Joseph, their patron saint, local carpenters would burn their old rubbish along with the wooden devices they used to hoist the candles that lit their workshops during the winter months. That is why the day of La Cremà (the day on which the Fallas are burnt down) is always the 19th of March, Saint Joseph’s day.

The Event

Around the middle of March, an unforgettable, explosive party takes place in Valencia city. No other place in the world celebrates an event that is more fascinating than the Fallas, an event that has been declared an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO (Patrimonio de la Humanidad de la Unesco) in 2016.

March 1 – 19

Mascletà

Officially on March 1 to 19, precisely at 2pm, Plaza del Ayuntamiento vibrates with an explosive display – gunpowder and fireworks, a tradition known as ‘mascletà’. A tip shared locals – keep your mouth open during mascletà to help distribute the sound and not hurt your eardrums.

 

March 15 – 19

Fireworks and the Nit del Foc

Each night at midnight, people gather on Paseo de la Alameda to enjoy the València sky fill up with with light and colour of impressive firework displays. On the early hours of March 18, a more spectalur show is held. It is called Nit del Foc (Night of Fire).

 

March 15 – 16

La plantà (the installation)

Takes place, when the falleros and falleras,  get together and work through the night on putting them together in order to have them finished by dawn on the 16th. Soon after, a jury visits all the sculptures (over 750) throughout the city and chooses the winners. 

 

March 19

La Cremà (The Burning)

On the evening of March 19, all of the sculptures, go up in flames. At 10 pm,  La Cremà of the children’s sculptures begins. Two hours later, the large sculptures. The last one to burn is the falla at Plaza del Ayuntamiento, usually at 1 am. It is always preceded by a small but spectacular fireworks display which fill the square with noise, light and colour. This Cremà marks the end of the festival.

 

March 17

Prize Award Ceremony

An exciting day for all falleros because on the morning of 17th, the falleros go to Plaza del Ayuntamiento to collect their prizes. 

 

March 17 – 18

Ofrenda de Flores
(Offering of Flowers)

Takes place, when the falleros and falleras,  get together and work through the night on putting them together in order to have them finished by dawn on the 16th. Soon after, a jury visits all the sculptures (over 750) throughout the city and chooses the winners.

 

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